Last edited by Dunris
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

9 edition of Gellius the satirist found in the catalog.

Gellius the satirist

Roman cultural authority in Attic nights

by Wytse Hette Keulen

  • 30 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Brill in Leiden, Boston .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Gellius, Aulus,
  • Gellius, Aulus -- Criticism and interpretation,
  • Rome -- In literature

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statementby Wytse Keulen.
    SeriesMnemosyne supplements : monographs on Greek and Roman language and literature -- v. 297
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPA6391 .K48 2009
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22515235M
    ISBN 109789004169869
    LC Control Number2008038911

    Aulus Gellius (ca. – CE) is known almost wholly from his Noctes Atticae (Attic Nights), so called because it was begun during the nights of an Attic winter. The work collects in twenty books (of Book VIII only the index is extant) interesting notes covering philosophy, history, biography, all . Frontispiece to a Latin edition of the Attic Nights [ fr] by Jakob Gronovius Aulus Gellius (c. – after AD) was a Latin au­thor and gram­mar­ian, who was prob­a­bly born and cer­tainly brought up in Rome. He was ed­u­cated in Athens, after which he re­turned to Rome, where he held a ju­di­cial of­fice.

    Since Leofranc Holford-Strevens’ magisterial Aulus Gelliusin and its revised edition,1there have been a number of excellent monographs on this complex Antonine excerpter and raconteur. in particular was a vintage year, which saw the publication both of the marvelously idiosyncratic Nox Philologiaeof Erik Gunderson (University of Wisconsin Press, reviewed BMCR ) and Wytse .   Johnson then moves on to explore elite reading during the era of the Antonines, including the medical community around Galen, the philological community around Gellius and Fronto (with a look at the curious reading habits of Fronto's pupil Marcus Aurelius), and the intellectual communities lampooned by the satirist Lucian.

    Aulus Gellius (c. – after AD) was a Latin author and grammarian, who was probably born and certainly brought up in was educated in Athens, after which he returned to Rome, where he held a judicial is famous for his Attic Nights, a commonplace book, or compilation of notes on grammar, philosophy, history, antiquarianism and other subjects, preserving fragments of. Wytse Keulen is the author of Gellius the Satirist ( avg rating, 0 ratings, 0 reviews, published ) and The Ancient Novel and Beyond ( avg rati 3/5(1).


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Gellius the satirist by Wytse Hette Keulen Download PDF EPUB FB2

Gellius the Satirist: Roman Cultural Authority in Attic Nights (Mnemosyne Supplements: Monographs on Greek and Roman Language and Literature) by Wytse Keulen (Author) ISBN Cited by:   This monograph presents an original portrait of the second-century miscellanist Aulus Gellius, based on a detailed reading of Attic Nights against its contemporary background.

Highlighting Gellius’ use of humour and irony in his portrayals of controversial celebrities such as Favorinus and Herodes Atticus, the book provides a necessary corrective to Gellius the satirist book of Gellius as an Cited by: Gellius the Satirist Roman Cultural Authority in Attic Nights Series: Mnemosyne, Supplements, Volume: Gellius the Satirist: Roman Cultural Authority in Attic Nights (Mnemosyne Supplements: Monographs on Greek and Roman Language and Literature) This monograph presents an original portrait of the second-century miscellanist Aulus Gellius, based on a detailed reading of "Attic Nights" against its contemporary background.

In this learned and ingenious but problematic book Keulen argues that in the Attic Nights, hitherto considered purely as a learned miscellany enlivened with vignettes of Antonine life, Aulus Gellius deploys his considerable powers of irony and satire to the deflation of all cultural authorities except himself, whom he commends to the emperor as a humble but invaluable adviser.

It will be no. Buy Gellius the Satirist: Roman Cultural Authority in Attic Nights (Mnemosyne, Supplements) by Keulen, Wytse (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low. Aulus Gellius (c. – after AD) was a Roman author and grammarian, who was probably born and certainly brought up in was educated in Athens, after which he returned to is famous for his Attic Nights, a commonplace book, or compilation of notes on grammar, philosophy, history, antiquarianism, and other subjects, preserving fragments of the works of many authors who might.

X [10arg] The meaning of proletarii and capite censi; also of adsiduus Gellius the satirist book the Twelve Tables, and the origin of the day there was a cessation of business in the Forum at Rome, and as the holiday was being joyfully celebrated, it chanced that one of the books of the Annals of Ennius was read in an assembly of very many persons.

In this book the following lines occurred: 1. I READ a book of Marcus Cicero's entitled The Orator. In that book when Cicero had said that the verbs aifugio and aufero were indeed formed of the preposition ab and the verbs fugio and fero, but that the preposition, in order that the word might be smoother in pronunciation and sound, was changed and altered into the syllable au, 6 and aufulgio and aufero began to be used for abfugio and.

Aulus Gellius book. Read 4 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Aulus Gellius (ca. CE) is known almost wholly from his Noctes /5(4). 1 The flamen was the special priest of an individual deity. There were three flamines maiores—of Jupiter (Dialis), Mars and Quirinus—and twelve flamines minores.

For “taboos” imposed on priests see Frazer, Golden Bough, ch. 2 Fr. 19, 24, 35, 46, R. Peter; fr. 3, Huschke; id. Bremer (i, p. 10). 3 Classis originally meant one of the classes into which the citizens were divided by the. The Attic Nights of Aulus Gellius: Book VI I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX X XI XII section 12arg.

section 1. XIII XIV XV XVI XVII XVIII XIX XX XXI XXII BOOK VII Book VIII Book IX Book X BOOK XI BOOK XII Book XIII Book. Gellius the Satirist: Roman Cultural Authority in Attic Nights (Mnemosyne Supplements: Monographs on Greek and Roman Language and Literature) - پروژه ها کتاب, معرفی کتاب, کتاب فارسی, معرفی کتاب ها, کتب, دانلود کتاب, کتاب جدید, خرید کتاب, کتاب دانشگاهی.

Gellius the satirist: Roman cultural authority in Attic nights. [Wytse Hette Keulen] -- Presents a portrait of the second-century miscellanist Aulus Gellius. Highlighting Gellius' use of humour and irony in his portrayals of controversial celebrities such as Favorinus and Herodes.

Noting previously unrecognised allusions to literary works and contemporary events, this book presents an original portrait of the miscellanist Aulus Gellius (Attic Nights) as a satirical writer and a Roman intellectual working within the cultural milieu of Antonine Rome.

Gellius the Satirist: Roman Cultural Authority in Attic Nights (Mnemosyne Supplements: Monographs on Greek and Roman Language and Literature) Wytse Keulen. Hardcover. $ Next. Special offers and product promotions.

Amazon Business: For business-only pricing, quantity discounts and FREE : Joseph A. Howley. Gnaeus Gellius (fl. 2nd half of 2nd century BC) was a Roman historian. Very little is known about his life and work, which has only survived in scattered fragments. He continued the historical tradition set by Fabius Pictor of writing a year-by-year history of Rome from mythological times to his day.

However, with about a hundred books, Gellius' Annales were massively more developed than the. KEULEN, GELLIUS THE SATIRIST: ROMAN CULTURAL AUTHORITY IN THE ATTIC NIGHTS (Mnemosyne Supplement ).

Leiden/Boston: Brill, Pp. isbn £ Aulus Gellius has for a long time been one of those authors who are more frequently quoted than read. a spectacular episode is not alien to Gellius' method. Conversely, he might have noted the event. Peregrinus featured in an item in the missing Book 8 of the Noctes Atticae.

Other personalities provide pertinent chronological allusions and delusions. Through Sulpicius Apollinaris, Gellius. Aulus Gellius (ca. — CE) is known almost wholly from his Noctes Atticae, 'Attic Nights', so called because it was begun during the nights of an Attic winter. The work collects in twenty books (of Book VIII only the index is extant) interesting notes covering philosophy, history, biography, all sorts of antiquities, points of law, literary criticism, and lexicographic matters.

He also published a monograph on Aulus Gellius (Gellius the Satirist: Roman Cultural Authority in Attic Nights, Leiden: Brill ). Ulrike Egelhaaf-Gaiser is professor of Latin Language and Literature at the University of Göttingen. She presented a monograph on Apuleius' Isis Book ().Aulus Gellius (ca.

CE) is known almost wholly from his Noctes Atticae, 'Attic Nights', so called because it was begun during the nights of an Attic winter. The work collects in twenty books (of Book VIII only the index is extant) interesting notes covering philosophy, history, biography, all sorts of antiquities, points of law, literary criticism, and lexicographic matters Reviews: 1.

One, Wytse Keulen’s Gellius the Satirist, offered a way of thinking about Gellius as someone who writes not only for others, but also to fashion a sense of identity. Gellius’s emphasis on Rome gives him a way to put himself in the center of that story; his hobnobbing with Favorinus allows him to subtly curate his own identity.